My bikes

Specialized P.1 AM 2010



Specialized Allez Triple 2009


ROSE PRO-SL 2000 2011





GENESIS DAY ONE ALFINE 2012




FELT NINE 30 2013



72 comments:

  1. Not sure when you got the road bike but what a cracker!!!

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  2. nice bike,whats it ride like? im from hastings and planning the bhf ride in august

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  3. Both bikes ride well. I did the London to Hastings on the Allez.

    How much cycling experience do you have?

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  4. i have a felt f-lite z100 road bike,been riding road bikes for about 7-8 months,really gotten into it,just did 43 miles today

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  5. hi, thinking of getting the same rose bike, what's it like?

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  6. The Rose is a lovely bike to ride. Having used the bike configurator on the Rose website and entering my measurements, the bike fits me better than my Specialized Allez.

    It may well depend on what components you choose. I chose a carbon seat post as recommended by Cycling Plus magazine.

    I also chose fizik bar gel tape but it's not as spongy as I would have liked.

    I have changed the saddle since I got the bike but that was inevitable as I knew the standard saddle probably wouldn't suit me. I need one with a cut out. However, I'm gutted that I couldn't get on with the Prologo saddle as it looks perfect on the bike.

    Remember, when choosing components for the bike that you can make it as custom as you like. You are not limited by the items listed in the configurator. You can choose any product from their 1,000 page catalogue.

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  7. Can you tell me what diameter the seatpost is on the Rose I have one on order, and it is too late to change the order, so trying to swap one form another bike - Thanks.

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  8. It depends on the frame size. Mine's a 27.2mm one.

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  9. OK. I have a 57 on order. What size frame is your Rose?

    I've tried the website for a bit of advice, but keep getting a German "out of office" reply.

    BTW - great effort!

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  10. I have the 51cm. The seatpost diameter for the 57cm is 27.2cm. Click on the Geometry tab on the website http://www.rosebikes.co.uk/article/rose-pro-sl-2000-double/aid:473334

    If you go to the Advice page, there is many email addresses for the different technicians. http://www.rosebikes.co.uk/content/services/advice

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  11. Toby, really admire what you're doing. I'm overweight and need to do something about it and stumbled across both yours and Frank Kinlan's blogs and I'm inspired to get started. I also sit in front of a PC all day and get no exercise and have piled the weight on from being a skinny youth. I'm 5' 10' and over 16st. I need to lose approx 3 1/2 st. In the great scheme this doesn’t seem like an earth shattering amount but for me it feels like it is.

    I've got a MTB but hardly ever ride it. I'm just not fit at all and struggle to ride for very long or far. It also just doesn't feel very suited to the road as I guess most MTB's don't. When I was young I had a 'racer' which I rode everywhere. I'm thinking about buying something like your Allez but would be interested in your thoughts on how much nicer it is to ride on the road compared to your MTB and how much easier it is to cover distance on.

    Thanks, Simon.

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  12. Hi Simon,

    Thanks for getting in touch. What ever your target, it's achievable. Think positive and you will get there.

    You can comfortably cover large distances on a mountain bike but a road bike will be more efficient. I would say that you're fine starting off with the mountain bike as you want to burn calories, not cover distance. Time on the bike is key. Set yourself target and slowly but steadily increase your time in the saddle. You'll be surprised how quickly your strength and fitness will improve.

    Of course, you'll need to change your diet a bit. Eating regularly and cutting your portion size down is a good start.

    I wish you all the best and keep in touch.

    Toby

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  13. Hi, mate, I am looking at buying the same Rose bike as you, in brown so we don't clash;-)

    Rose website reckons I need a 53 size, but I am 5'8" and all the online calcs recon I need a 55! What inseam and height are you mate?

    Cheers

    Steve

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  14. Hi Steve,

    I'm 170cm tall (5'6.8") and inseam is 77cm (30.5") and I have 51cm frame and it's perfect for me. If you measure yourself properly the Rose calc should be spot on.

    Good to hear you're getting another colour ;-)

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  15. SimonB - just a little tip - pump up your mountain bike tyres, or get a pair of 'slicks' will make the journey a little easier and cheaper than getting a new bike, until you are sure cycling is for you.
    Then, when you get a lightweight - you will fly!!!

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  16. Just saw your article in cycling active, well done, you've done really well. Your story more or less mirrors my own. At the age of 40 and just under 23 stone I got a mountain bike, 4 years later, and 3 road bikes later I'm at a steady 14 stone and completely hooked on cycling. Well done and keep it up.
    The best bit is I can spend money and my wife doesn't mind as it's keeping me healthy.

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  17. Great work dude. I'm knocking about 18.5 stone and i've just organised a london to paris charity bikeride for August. Better get me some training done! The Rose is awesome by the way. I've just bought a CUBE Peloton for my first ever road bike. Fell off it on the maiden voyage and spent 3 weeks off work! But its not how often you fall off is it......????

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  18. You can get a lot of training done in 3 months, believe me.

    The Cube looks good. Better than my first road bike :-)

    If you don't fall off, you can't call yourself a proper cyclist.

    Good luck.

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  19. I intend to dude. I was reading in a cycling mag about an app you can get that links to a website. Its called Strava. Its awesome for tracking your rides, have a look. Its also free.

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  20. There's a number of apps that do that. I use Strava but use my Garmin to upload my rides to it.

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  21. Hi Toby,
    I am 30 years old and 242lb now, and seriously thinking to loose some weight using bike riding. My house is about 5km away from the office, and it's an urban road. I am thinking to but a second hand road bike (the new one is extremely expensive), but I am not really sure if this type of bike is suitable for someone of my weight. I am looking at your bikes, but not relly sure what type are they (i am new to all these). Can you give some advice? Thanks

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  22. Hello Aizuddin,

    At your weight, a road bike is a sensible option, especially if you hope to get lighter. Buying second hand is OK. A road bike had drop handle bars. You may want to consider a hybrid or a flat bar road bike.

    Good luck.

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  23. Hi Toby, it is me again.
    I really need our opinion on a bike i am about to buy from an auction in the link below. You are the only person I know with the bike knowledge. I really hope you wont mind.
    1. Is this bike suitable for someone of my size (172cm)?
    2. Is the price of NZD450 or GBP222 reasonable for this bike? I have no idea about this brand and model to make the decision. I hope you can help me...

    http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=482259696

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  24. The frame size depends on your inside leg measurement. I'm 170cm and a 52cm bike is about as big as I can stand over comfortably.

    The bike looks a little old but in reasonable condition. Trek make very good bikes. It's probably worth the money if it's serviced beforehand as suggested.

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  25. toby
    love the genesis pray tell what was the decision to buy this beauty i do not think i have ever seen one advertised or written about.well done on all your achievements

    pete

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  26. Hi Pete,

    I wanted a solid winter commuting bike that would be easy to maintain. The bonus of drop handle bars and disc brakes was a major factor and the orange colour was the deciding factor.

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  27. Hi Toby,
    Your blog is very inspiring to me, im just embarking on my jounrney to health and fitness im 39 and 19 stone, 6ft tall. I would like some advice please, are you happy with the compact crank on your rose or would you advise a triple? Also is the Rose a comfortable ride or full out race position?
    Kind Regards
    Dan

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  28. Hi Daniel. Very happy with the compact chainset on the Rose. However when I was starting out I relied heavily on the low gears of my mountain bike. They were required for every incline.

    My first Road bike was the Allez with the triple chainset. This was helpful as I was at the stage where I was looking for hills for the challenge. I got the Rose a year into my riding and was quite fit and very much lower in weight. The compact chainset is good for a fit rider and almost as low as a triple. The ride position on the Rose is great and it's my most comfortable bike to ride. You can have the stem facing upward for more comfort too.

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  29. Hi Toby,
    Thanks for the reply, like you im having a nightmare trying to find the right bike for me, so much info i cant decide, did you look at canyon bikes? also from Germany.
    Thanks
    Dan

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  30. I fell in love with the look of the Rose when I saw it at the London Bike Show so didn't need to look at any other brand. All Rose bikes are fully customisable. Every single component so it fits like a glove.

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  31. Hi Toby,

    I've just read your blog - what an awesome story!

    I too am a lard-arse and having just got a new job, I've decided it's time to ditch the car, save a fortune and go on a push-iron!

    No-one seems to have asked you the obvious question... as a fat-lad, how do you choose which bike to go with first as I've read loads of horror stories of broken spokes etc.

    Essentially, it seems to be a minefield, working out which bike will be suitable - obviously there is more choice as the weight comes off but it's the initial choice that's worrying me and I was just wondering if you have any advice?

    Cheers,
    John

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  32. Hi John,

    When I chose a bike I was so worried that I would break whatever I bought that I went for the strongest bike I could. However, it isn't necessary.

    Of course, the wheels can be prone to spoke breakages but to this day, I've not had a spoke break on any of my 4 bikes, including my mountain bike which gets quite a lot of off-road abuse nowadays. I'm not saying you won't get a spoke or two break but it's not the end of the world. The chances of them breaking as you lose weight will also go down.

    Some manufacturers will list bike weight limits but any quality bike (£400+) will hold 21st or so.

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  33. Hi Toby,

    My name is Mark, I have searched high and low for help with this but always get stuck.

    I am 30 stone, I had a bike that was ok to go but the tires always looked flatish, other bikes made for obese people cost £900+ easy so I was wondering if you had any advice at all? Any help will be truly appreciated, choking to hit the road again and lose this weight.

    Thanks

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  34. Hi Mark,

    Try getting a decent pump if you don't already have one and pump the tyres up to their maximum pressure as stated on the tyre sidewall. Get out and ride and if you get pinch punctures or broken spokes on a regular basis then that's the time to rethink. Also, cycling alone won't lose all the weight. Changing your diet will help and the quicker you get the weight down the less issues the bike will have.

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  35. Toby - your transformation is inspiring!
    I would like to congratulate you on the journey, well done!
    Question for you - I see you have 26" and 29" MTBs. Can you explain the differences between them and what you prefer?
    I've read many reviewes about it, everyone is reccomanding the 29" - but I'm not sure I like them so much.
    What do you think?
    Thanks, and keep up!

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  36. Thank you for your comments Anon.

    The 29er is to all intents and purposes the same as the 26 MTB but with bigger wheels. However the 29er rides differently. The 29er has a higher more commanding riding position and because of its longer wheel base it rolls over rough terrain faster but is less nimble in tricky conditions.

    I prefer the 29er to be honest and would recommend one to anybody. However, different companies ave different geometries so you may need to try before you buy.

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  37. Thanks Toby.
    I took your advice and ended up buying a Scott Scale 29er.
    I'm Mark, by the way.

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  38. Hi Mark,

    I Like the Scott Scale range of 29ers.

    Enjoy.

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  39. Well done Toby , your an inspiration, I have been cycling for a short while now and have lost weight that I need to, I was tipping 15+ stone and am now 13, I'm 5.7 and need to go another 2.5 or so,I work at a desk all day and my commute is over 15 miles so a bit far to cycle to work, (for now anyway) I have a hybred ,( Carrera subway), and find it ok ,a little tough on the steep hills, but I'll tough it out, again well done and I will keep up with your blog,
    all the best,
    Mike

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  40. Hi Mike,

    Thanks for getting in touch and thanks for sharing your progress.

    All the best,

    Toby

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  41. Just out of curiosity why do you need so many bikes? Ain't one good enough? Sorry if its dumb question to ask

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  42. Hi Linnux,

    Good question. There's a few reason's why. Firstly, you can never have too many bikes. Secondly, it's always best to have the right bike for the specific type of riding you're doing. Thirdly, it helps keep the cycling exciting, something that's important when you ride the same journey hundreds of times a year.

    Also, my first bike doesn't really get ridden by me any more and I'm waiting to pass it on to my son. My newest bike was a competition prize and although I ride it from time to time, my wife rides it now.

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  43. Started reading this a yr ago when my mrs bought some cycling trousers facebook and was told about this site. lol since then i now have 2 mtbs one is a singlespeed the other a full carbon hardtail that i built myself and a merida rd bike keep it up you are sn inspiration to all us fattys

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  44. Hi Nick,

    Well done. Keep on pedalling.

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  45. Hi Toby,
    Great work mate, you look great.
    I started my cycling only a month ago already hooked. I am 21st but riding 15 miles a day, everyday no problem at all. I am now a cycling nut, Felt mountain bike for fun. And a Scott cx comp. For training.
    The reason for my post is there are a lot of questions here as to bikes for us heavy guys. If you really want a road type bike but worried about your weight go for a cyclocross bike. I am riding with a mate he is nearly 25 stone and he has a kona jake. Both our CX bikes are more than up to the weight. We often use them off road. Just make sure the wheels are nice and true. We both bought ours from ebay both for under £350.00.
    I would just like to say you are right about diet too. cycling alone cannot do it. But it gets easier as you train more and the feel good factor comes in. 20lbs lost in a month just another 80 to go. and enjoying every ride,
    Keep up the good work.

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  46. thanks toby- you have motivated me!!!!! I am going to do it this time!!!

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  47. Being a 24 stone rider (340 lb) from the US i was glad to happen on your youtube clip and blog. I have been riding on and off for a couple years, Doing MS bike rides to support the charity for Multiple Sclerosis. My wife has it so I am fighting for her in the long run and my health as well. Been riding a steel mountain bike I added smoothies to but hoping to get a road bike soon. My main issue is fit. I have an odd short leg long body setup that makes finding a bike a circus. I have been looking at the allez triple and wondered how you liked it.

    I think I need to join the club and get a blog going to keep myself accountable and offer help to others as you have.

    Thanks for your story and your time sharing it!

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  48. Hi JD. Thanks for sharing your story. If you have a longer body you could always go with a longer stem and a set back seat post.

    The Allez is a great bike and I've done 10,000 miles on mine.

    If you start a blog, let me know and I'll follow you.

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  49. How could you go from Specialized with drop bars to a mountain bike bar hybrid !?!?! : P

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  50. Hi Scott. I went from the mountain bike to the road bike. I ride both now though.

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  51. Hi toby, i must be mad but i just signed up to the welsh 50km velaton suggested by my pt for june 2015. However i have no bike at mo i use a spin bike at home. The worry i have is im currently at the beginning of my weight lost journey and still around 23st, im so motivayed to do this event and will train hard but i have no clue where to start shopping for a bike any help would b great xc

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  52. Hi Kirsty. Thanks for getting in touch. I'd suggest going with a hybrid. I don't know what your budget is, but if you can spend at least £350 on a new bike then you'll have a good quality bike that will last a long time. If you have any further questions, click on the about me tab at the top of the page and send me an email.

    All the best with your cycling and weight loss.

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  53. Hi, you have done an amazing job! Great weight loss and blog and website. I'm really impressed with the bikes too. Just wondering do the rode bikes accommodate a hefty 18/19 stone chap? How have you found it handling the treacherous London roads? Would be grateful for your opinions.
    Many thanks
    M

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  54. Sorry that the Rose bikes I was asking about- thanks ;)

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  55. Hi Mattson. Thanks you for you comments. I would guess that 18-19 stone is a little too heavy for a road bike. The biggest problem will be broken spokes or pinch flats. If you want a road bike I'd suggest you get one with 36 spoke wheels and don't get a carbon seat post.

    All the best,

    Toby

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  56. Nice bike stable.
    I ride a Genesis Day One too - only mine is a single speed disc brake version.

    http:challengemenace.blogspot.co.uk

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  57. I love my Day One. I'll check out your blog.

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  58. One can also practice this hobby or sport for a reason that is not only beneficial for them but also make use of them for charity purposes.

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  59. Toby, currently I am 420lb and looking to loose it fast, is there a suitable bike I could ride now? Looking to do road and tracks on it, nothing too demanding, at first.

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  60. Hi Anon. I don't know of any bike makers that will guarantee that weight as it's the wheels that take the strain. Look for a bike with 36 spokes per wheel for the most durability. Good luck.

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  61. Hi, I would like to ask for your opinion. I am 17. 8 stone, 175cm height, 78cm inseam. I am thinking to get a hybrid bike.
    http://serbasepeda.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=59_242&product_id=287

    Would this bike be a good choice for me? It has 21" frame size.

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  62. That looks a fine bike to me Yokho

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  63. Am curious I am 30 stones am really want to get a bike but have no clue where to start is there a bike out there that will support my weight? any help will be gladly appreciated and you can email me any ideas where I might find one at montra38@live.com

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  64. Hi Henry. The answer is yes. You may get some spokes break but any bike shop can fix these. Take a look at Gary Brennan's site. https://theamazing39stonecyclist.wordpress.com/am-i-too-heavy-for-a-bike/

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  65. Hi. I have an old dual suspension GT mountain bike, complete with nobbly tyres, that I use to potter about on. A few friends have got into a bit of road cycling for a bit of fitness (all biggish blokes, 40ish yrs old), nothing too serious, but I'm inclined to get out with them to shift a bit of weight myself too. Most started on old mountain bikes but quickly got wise and graduated to hybrids/road bikes.
    My trusty GT just isn't going to cut it. I realise the dual suspension is going to be a killer, absorbing so much of the energy, so I've decided to look at a cheap second hand hybrid to see how I get on before talking the plunge properly.

    Here are my options at present.
    Carrera Gryphon - 21inch frame, 28inch wheels, 1 option has disc brakes, the other option doesn't.
    Carrera Subway 1 - 22inch frame, 27.5inch wheels, disc brakes.

    At this point, I should say, I'm 6ft2 and just shy of 20st, hence I'm seeking advice over which is going to be most suitable for someone my size. Height wise, and what is going to best cope with my weight.

    Seeking advice.

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  66. The Gryphon seems to be most like a flat bar road bike but depending on your fitness you may well struggle up the hills with the gear setup. Disc brakes are a real bonus in all conditions.

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  67. Hi Toby
    I have been riding a 20 year old Carrera Symmetry for around 5 months now. So far I haven't had any real problems with it (although it does creak a bit when I'm powering uphill and the gears are now badly worn and it's going in for a service).

    I have tried to look for weight limit information on Carrera Symmetry's but there is virtually nothing, with them being such old bikes.

    I'm 5'10" and 18 stone and I think I may be getting too big for the bike since I have actually put weight on since I started cycling, even though it is a fairly sturdy mountain bike. What do you think?

    Cheers, Richard

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    Replies
    1. An old bike that's serviced properly should be OK. 18st shouldn't be an issue, however watch out for spokes breaking.

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